The best guide to learn about different types of Ultrafast lasers


The best guide to learn about different types of Ultrafast lasers

  20-Oct-2022
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Ultrashort laser pulses with peak frequencies in the UV, blue and IR spectral range enable us to explore new physical phenomena. In the field of quantum optics, these light sources are used to drive quantum phenomena and to enhance the resolution of spectroscopic experiments by orders of magnitude.

In this post we introduce you to ultrafast laser spectroscopy, what it is and how it can be employed. You will learn about different types of ultrashort lasers (fundamental, harmonic and supra-harmonic), as well as see some real-world applications that involve these high-intensity lasers.

Introduction to Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy

Ultrafast laser spectroscopy is a technique that uses ultra-short laser pulses to obtain absorption spectra and explore the excited-state dynamics of molecules and solids. When ultrafast laser pulses hit a sample, they induce non-linear processes that cause a large increase in the sample’s brightness.

This illumination is typically 10-100 times brighter than the normal sample fluorescence from the sample. The resulting increase in sample brightness is crucial to increase the sensitivity of the experiments. This is essential because the slow relaxation processes that occur after the laser excitation do not contribute to the fluorescence signal.

In summary, ultrafast laser spectroscopy allows us to study transient phenomena in great detail.

What is Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy?

Ultrafast laser spectroscopy is a technique for studying the dynamics of quantum systems. In particular, ultrafast laser spectroscopy allows one to probe the time scales and energy scales associated with the motion of an electron in a molecule or atom.

This technique can be used to obtain information about the vibrational and rotational properties of molecules, as well as the intermolecular interactions among the molecules. In particular, ultrafast laser spectroscopy can be used to study excited electronic states, the development and decay of short-lived electronically excited states, and the intermolecular interactions between molecules.

Fundamental Ultrafast Lasers

A fundamental ultrafast laser is an ordinary laser that uses a gas discharge (in a tube) as a light source. The most common laser used in experiments is the Nd : YAG laser, which uses neodymium-doped YAG (yttrium aluminium garnet) as the gain medium. The output of this laser is at a wavelength of 1064 nm (infrared).

A harmonic ultrafast laser uses a non-linear crystal to generate wavelengths that are multiples of the driving frequency. In other words, it is an optical oscillator with a frequency of the laser light emission that is generated by a non-linear crystal (e.g., KDP or BBO).

Supra-Harmonic Ultrafast Lasers

Supra-harmonic ultrafast lasers are a relatively new type of ultrafast laser that generates light with a very high peak power. These lasers are often driven by optical fiber-based sources such as mode-locked fiber lasers and chirped-pulse fiber lasers.

The high peak power of supra-harmonic lasers is due to their very short pulse duration. The shortest pulses are those where the laser pulse is compressed during its propagation through a fiber.

Applications of Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopy

Ultrafast laser spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique to explore the dynamics of quantum systems and to investigate the excited-state properties of molecules and solids. This technique is used in chemistry and physics, materials science and biology, but also in materials processing and technology.

In chemistry and physics, ultrafast laser spectroscopy is used to study the excited-state properties of molecules and solids. It is also used to investigate the intermolecular interactions between molecules. In materials science and technology, ultrafast laser spectroscopy is used for processing materials.

Summary

Ultrafast laser spectroscopy is a technique that uses ultra-short laser pulses to obtain absorption spectra and explore the excited-state dynamics of molecules and solids. Ultrafast laser spectroscopy is a powerful experimental technique to explore the dynamics of quantum systems and to investigate the excited-state properties of molecules and solids. This technique is used in chemistry and physics, materials science and technology, and also in biology.

The Global Ultrafast Lasers Market size is expected to reach $3.7 billion by 2028, rising at a market growth of 15.3% CAGR during the forecast period.