Proton Radiation Therapy Work and its Benefits you should know


Proton Radiation Therapy Work and its Benefits you should know

  10-Oct-2022
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Proton radiation therapy is a type of external beam radiation therapy in which the primary beam used for treatment is hydrogen (proton) ions. Protons have an identical positive charge, which means that they respond to magnetic fields. The protons are accelerated using a particle accelerator and become charged particles.

Once they are charged with energy, they are guided through the magnetic fields so that they can be introduced into the patient’s tumor. Proton radiation therapy was first developed in the 1920s but has recently gained popularity as a non-invasive alternative to traditional photon-based radiotherapy. Here we look at proton radiation devices and their advantages over existing medical technologies.

What is Proton Radiation Therapy?

Proton radiation therapy is a type of external beam radiation therapy in which the primary beam used for treatment is hydrogen (proton) ions. Protons have an identical positive charge, which means that they respond to magnetic fields. The protons are accelerated using a particle accelerator and become charged particles.

Once they are charged with energy, they are guided through the magnetic fields so that they can be introduced into the patient’s tumor. In proton therapy, the accelerator uses a particle accelerator to deliver particles to the tumor site. The particles are accelerated by electricity and are then magnetically guided to the tumor using magnets in the machine. These magnets create a path for the charged particles to travel through while they are being guided to the tumor site.

How Does Proton Radiation Therapy Work?

In proton therapy, the accelerator uses a particle accelerator to deliver particles to the tumor site. The particles are accelerated by electricity and are then magnetically guided to the tumor using magnets in the machine. These magnets create a path for the charged particles to travel through while they are being guided to the tumor site.

There are two types of proton therapy: Accelerated proton radiation therapy and thermal proton therapy. Proton therapy delivers electrons to the tumor instead of protons. The electrons are then stopped by the tumor and produce heat.

Benefits of Proton Radiation Therapy

With proton therapy, the radiation dose is deposited in the tumor while sparing the rest of the body. This leads to fewer side effects and a higher chance of survival. Proton therapy is ideal for treating tumors in sensitive sites like the brain, spine, and kidneys. The treatment works by targeting the tumor with a high dose of radiation, while sparing the normal tissues around the tumor.

Since proton therapy deposits the radiation dose in the tumor and not the rest of the body, it has a lower chance of causing side effects. Proton therapy is often used to treat tumors in the spine because the spine has a high number of nerves, blood vessels, and muscles. A regular radiation treatment may damage these tissues, leading to painful side effects and a lower chance of survival.

If a patient’s tumor is close to the spine, proton therapy may be recommended, since it’s less likely to damage the nearby nerves, blood vessels, and muscles.

Limitations of Proton Radiation Therapy

While proton therapy is less damaging to healthy cells and organs than other types of radiation therapy, it isn’t completely harmless to healthy cells. While proton therapy does deposit most of the radiation dose in the tumor, it is not possible for the radiation to be completely absorbed by the tumor.

Some healthy cells will be exposed to the radiation and damaged as a result.

For example, if the patient’s tumor is close to the spine, some of the radiation may be absorbed by the spine and cause damage to the healthy cells in that area.

Side Effects of Proton Radiation Therapy

Because proton therapy delivers higher doses of radiation to tumor cells than other types of radiation therapy, it causes more side effects related to damage to healthy cells.

Examples of side effects include:

Nausea and vomiting

Some patients may experience nausea and vomiting while they are receiving proton therapy. Taking antiemetics (drugs that prevent nausea and vomiting) before each treatment may help reduce these side effects.

Skin irritation

Proton therapy can cause skin irritation. This can be treated with creams or ointments and may improve over time.

Hair loss

Hair loss is more common with proton therapy compared to other types of radiation therapy. Some patients may need to wear a wig or use hairpieces to cover hair loss.

Fertility issues

It is not known how proton therapy affects male fertility. It is possible that proton therapy impairs sperm production, but this has not been studied in men. In women, radiation therapy can cause damage to the ovaries, which may lead to reduced fertility or permanent infertility.

How to Choose a Proton Therapy Center?

When looking for a proton therapy center, it is important to find a center that meets your needs. Here are some things to consider:

Completeness of the clinical trial: Before enrolling in a clinical trial, make sure the trial is complete. Incomplete clinical trials may last longer than necessary.

Clinician experience: Find out how long the center has been offering proton therapy. A shorter history may indicate that the center is new and does not have a lot of experience treating patients.

Drug availability: Make sure the drugs needed for your treatment are available at the center.

Treatment costs: The costs of proton therapy may be covered by your insurance. Make sure you understand the terms of your insurance coverage before enrolling in proton therapy.

Conclusion

Proton radiation therapy is a type of external beam radiation therapy in which the primary beam used for treatment is hydrogen (proton) ions. Protons have an identical positive charge, which means that they respond to magnetic fields. The protons are accelerated using a particle accelerator and become charged particles.

Once they are charged with energy, they are guided through the magnetic fields so that they can be introduced into the patient’s tumor. In proton therapy, the accelerator uses a particle accelerator to deliver particles to the tumor site.

The particles are accelerated by electricity and are then magnetically guided to the tumor using magnets in the machine. These magnets create a path for the charged particles to travel through while they are being guided to the tumor site.

The Global Proton Therapy Market size is expected to reach $963.6 million by 2028, rising at a market growth of 12.5% CAGR during the forecast period.